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When Bad Management Is A Good Example

18 Jun

Yesterday I channeled my ‘inner Dick Young’ and wrote a story about how the Mets botched Willie Randolph’s firing.

Dick Young was a cantankerous sports writer for the New York Daily News.

He would have been all over the Mets yesterday.

How the firing was done seemed to bother everybody, except Mets management.

There was almost no question it was coming. Randolph’s job security seemed to be day to day and almost inning to inning.

Things turned bad for him last fall when the Mets blew a seven game lead and the Phillies won the Eastern Division Championship.

Managers don’t keep their gigs in New York when that happens.

The daily rumors of Willie’s firing peaked over the weekend. The Mets won two out of three from Texas, flew to Los Angeles and won the first game of the series 9-6.

He seemed safe.

Wrong.

General Manager Omar Minaya gave the news to Willie and two coaches after the win.

Word of the firing was released to the media at 3am New York time.

The big question was why now?

The midnight firing made Mets management seem sinister, heartless or incompetent.

Suddenly the manager booed by fans was a hero.

In business timing is everything.

The Mets would have avoided a major public relations problem with better planning.

The New York media is brutal today.

Articles are bringing up other stupid moves made by the Mets over the past forty years. Most of them happened long before current ownership was involved.

I have not read one column in support of team management.

Some are even saying the Yankee’s Hank Steinbrenner is compassionate by comparison.

Now that’s pushing it.

We can all learn from the Mets.

We’ve all probably made some of the same mistakes.

Fans would have cheered the move had the Mets handled it right.

Next time you’re faced with a similar change, take time to write all the possible problems out on paper.

And don’t make any hasty moves.

 

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